Current Events

Coming up in the area…

STARworks will host a pottery jam Thu., Aug. 17, featuring a collaborative and improvisational demonstration by several potters who use different approaches and processes in their craft. It starts with a potluck supper at 5 p.m., followed by talks at 6 p.m. and demonstrations at 7, at STARworks on Russell Dr. in Star, and all are welcome. Details at 910-428-9001 and http://www.starworksnc.org.

West Montgomery High School upcoming reunions:

Class of 1987, 30-year reunion, Oct. 21, Haywood Event Center at The Ford Place, Mount Gilead. For information, email wmhs30threunion@yahoo.com, or visit the event’s Facebook page.

Class of 1997 – See the class Facebook group.

The pool at Stanback Park in Mount Gilead is open to the public seven days a week. Regular operating hours are Monday through Friday, 1 to 5 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 6 p.m. Water aerobics are offered Tuesdays and Thursday, 6 to 7 p.m. For more information, see Town Hall or call 910-439-5456.

The Montgomery County Farmer’s Market is open Thursdays, 3 to 6 p.m., in the parking lot next to the old hotel on N. Main St. in Troy.

The Montgomery County Council on Aging hosts activities for seniors every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday morning at Highland Community Center in Mount Gilead, with occasional activities in Wadeville, Pekin and other locations throughout the county. Find out more from the Council on Aging at 910-572-3757.

There is live bluegrass every weekend at Mount Gilead Music Barn. Showtime is Saturday night at 7:30.

Send news and community announcements from the menu link above, or call us toll-free at 1-855-881-WMTG (9684).


Staying Safe During the Aug. 21 Solar Eclipse

Looking directly at the Sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the Moon entirely blocks the Sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality.

The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the Sun. To date four manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17.

Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter. Always supervise children using solar filters.
Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright Sun. After glancing at the Sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the Sun.
Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the Sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device.
If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the Moon completely covers the Sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright Sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed Sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. With your back to the Sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the Sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse.

A solar eclipse is one of nature’s grandest spectacles. By following these simple rules, you can safely enjoy the view and be rewarded with memories to last a lifetime.

Safety information courtesy of NASA

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